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Posts tagged ‘Photos’

Monochrome Madness Week 21

As someone pointed out the other day we have been doing this for almost six months, maybe when we get to week 26 we should think of something special.  So if you have any ideas let me know. It is time for another week of Monochrome Madness, I hope you enjoy all the entries this week. banyule-flats-fog-morning-monochrome

For those of you who follow my blog, especially my Weekend Wanderings posts will know that I have been upset with the weather here, but I am so happy that I finally got a change to photograph some foggy scenes.  We have had a few mornings of fog, but I haven’t been able to get out, but this is about the 5th or 6th morning, so we haven’t had many.  I went all over the place, well to a few places that I thought would be good for fog.  This is one I took of Banyule Flats.  I really like the isolated, or desolate look (thanks for the word Jackie).  I thought this would be a great entry for today. For the link today I am sending you to my other blog where I did a post on the weekend, and I have put all the photos that I have done for MM, it was nice seeing them altogether, all 21 of them.

dave8-web-laura-macky

Laura Macky has done something completely different and sent a portrait.  If you want to find out more information on the portrait then please visit her blog post Birthday Boy in B&W – Monochrome Madness.

Don’t forget all the instructions on how to enter your own images are at the bottom of the post.  If you have entered an image then please remember to check your image in the gallery, scroll down and see if anyone has left you any comments.  

Now, if you wish to participate and submit an image here is how you do it:-

  • You must email me the image you want to include and if you have a blog or website, or somewhere else, please include the link. My email address is leanne@leannecole.com.au
  • The image size should be as small as it can be, so the largest side should be 1000 pixels or less.
  • Please insert either your name or your blogs name in the file name.
  • Remember I am on Australian time, so with GMT I am +11 hours at the moment, I publish my post on Wednesday morning.
  • If you need more help with sending images, and get confused about time zones, etc, well, there is a great website called The World Clock, if you go to that and look at Melbourne time, if it’s before 6pm on Tuesday evening, then you can still send me images.  If it’s after that time, you can send me an image, but it will be set aside for the following week.
  • Remember to include a link to your blog or website.
  • Please remember to resize your images, it is fairly simply, you just need to go into any editing software and usually under Image you will find, resize, scale, or image size, something like that and you can resize your image there. Change the dimensions to pixels and make the longest side 1000 pixels or smaller, hit return, and for most types of software that should change the other side automatically as well. Just remember to save it with a different name so you know it is the smaller version.  If you have any problems, please contact me, I don’t mind helping out.

Please note you don’t have to be a WordPress blogger to be in this challenge, you can have a link to a Facebook page, a Flickr page, anywhere really, or no link.  We just want to encourage people to do monochrome images, just for the madness of it. Just to let you know also, that as soon as the challenge is published, all emails and images you have sent me are deleted from my computer.  I respect your copyright and would never keep any of the images.

Monochrome Madness Week 20

This last week has flown and the entries have been coming in at a consistent speed for MM20.  Hard to believe this has been going for 20 weeks already.  It also seems to be contagious, the madness that is, with me receiving lots of submissions this week from lots of new people.  It is great to see more and more people wanting to participate in the challenge each week.  Welcome to all the new people, I hope you give them a warm welcome.

salt-lake-sticks-monochrome-mm

This is an image that I took up at the pink lakes.  I went through quite a few images before I finally settled on this one.  You know how it is, you can think one image will be good and then you process it but it just doesn’t turn out the way you hoped it would.  This one I did some different things to and I liked how it turned out.  There is a hint of colour, but I hope that you can’t really tell, except that I told you about it.

bay-bridge-web-monochrome

Laura Macky has sent in her image this week as well, two bridges over the bay in San Francisco, one that is being pulled down.  If you want more information then please visit Laura’s blog.

Don’t forget all the instructions on how to enter your own images are at the bottom of the post.  If you have entered an image then please remember to check your image in the gallery, scroll down and see if anyone has left you any comments.  

 

Now, if you wish to participate and submit an image here is how you do it:-

  • You must email me the image you want to include and if you have a blog or website, or somewhere else, please include the link. My email address is leanne@leannecole.com.au
  • The image size should be as small as it can be, so the largest side should be 1000 pixels or less.
  • Please insert either your name or your blogs name in the file name.
  • Remember I am on Australian time, so with GMT I am +11 hours at the moment, I publish my post on Wednesday morning.
  • If you need more help with sending images, and get confused about time zones, etc, well, there is a great website called The World Clock, if you go to that and look at Melbourne time, if it’s before 6pm on Tuesday evening, then you can still send me images.  If it’s after that time, you can send me an image, but it will be set aside for the following week.
  • Remember to include a link to your blog or website.
  • Please remember to resize your images, it is fairly simply, you just need to go into any editing software and usually under Image you will find, resize, scale, or image size, something like that and you can resize your image there. Change the dimensions to pixels and make the longest side 1000 pixels or smaller, hit return, and for most types of software that should change the other side automatically as well. Just remember to save it with a different name so you know it is the smaller version.  If you have any problems, please contact me, I don’t mind helping out.

Please note you don’t have to be a WordPress blogger to be in this challenge, you can have a link to a Facebook page, a Flickr page, anywhere really, or no link.  We just want to encourage people to do monochrome images, just for the madness of it. Just to let you know also, that as soon as the challenge is published, all emails and images you have sent me are deleted from my computer.  I respect your copyright and would never keep any of the images.

Monochrome Madness Week 19

Welcome to another week of Monochrome Madness and it seems the madness is continuing.  I have started finding myself doing monochrome images that aren’t for this, which I think is fantastic. I just want to explain something too, I don’t put information here on this post about the images or about the people submitting them because I think you should go to their blogs or their links and meet them that way.  I think of these posts as the first step in the introduction and it is up to you to take it further.

shearing-shed-old-woomelang-monochrome

My image this week is from the same place as last weeks, the 100 year old shearing shed that I got to photograph when I was up in the Mallee.  I have done a post on the image over on my other blog, My Image for MM19, and I did something new, I did a video of how I processed it.  It has been sped up and has music with it as well.

door-web

Here is Laura Macky’s image and as usual, you can go to her blog to find out more information about it, she has written the following post on it, The Door – Monochrome Madness.

Don’t forget if you like the MMC and would like to submit your own image then there are instructions at the end of this post on how you should do that.  Please remember to follow them.  It is great getting new people entering along with those that do it each week.  This challenge was set up so we would do more black and white, so if think you don’t do enough, then this is most definitely something you should consider. Now here is the gallery.

Now, if you wish to participate and submit an image here is how you do it:-

  • You must email me the image you want to include and if you have a blog or website, or somewhere else, please include the link. My email address is leanne@leannecole.com.au
  • The image size should be as small as it can be, so the largest side should be 1000 pixels or less.
  • Please insert either your name or your blogs name in the file name.
  • Remember I am on Australian time, so with GMT I am +11 hours at the moment, I publish my post on Wednesday morning.
  • If you need more help with sending images, and get confused about time zones, etc, well, there is a great website called The World Clock, if you go to that and look at Melbourne time, if it’s before 6pm on Tuesday evening, then you can still send me images.  If it’s after that time, you can send me an image, but it will be set aside for the following week.
  • Remember to include a link to your blog or website.
  • Please remember to resize your images, it is fairly simply, you just need to go into any editing software and usually under Image you will find, resize, scale, or image size, something like that and you can resize your image there. Change the dimensions to pixels and make the longest side 1000 pixels or smaller, hit return, and for most types of software that should change the other side automatically as well. Just remember to save it with a different name so you know it is the smaller version.  If you have any problems, please contact me, I don’t mind helping out.

Please note you don’t have to be a WordPress blogger to be in this challenge, you can have a link to a Facebook page, a Flickr page, anywhere really, or no link.  We just want to encourage people to do monochrome images, just for the madness of it. Just to let you know also, that as soon as the challenge is published, all emails and images you have sent me are deleted from my computer.  I respect your copyright and would never keep any of the images.

Monochrome Madness Week 18

It has been such a busy week and as time went on more and more images for Monochrome Madness came in.  I do enjoy doing this, but I have to admit this week was hard, but it is all good now and I am pleased to see it all come together again. I should start by saying I didn’t send anyone emails for their images, I want to apologise, but being away, there just wasn’t enough time.  Welcome to Week 18 of this Madness that we see in Monochrome.

clock-shearing-shed-mallee-time

While I was in the Mallee, I was given an opportunity to go and photograph a farm that has been operating for over a hundred years.  On the farm was an old shearing shed that they still use today.  It was fantastic to wander around it and see the pieces that are really old and the new additions, plus all the bits in between.  This clock was hanging on the wall in one of the sheep pens.  I couldn’t resist taking a photo, though the clock doesn’t work anymore, I like all the textures on it and around it. I think it is funny that I chose this image, I have felt that the last few days I’ve needed more of this, more time.

frogs

Laura Macky has submitted the above image this week for Monochrome Madness and if you want to read about the image, then go to her post Ribbit.

Here we go again, another week of Monochrome Madness, the gallery.  The links for the images are below the images, and don’t forget if you want to participate in this Madness, the instructions are at the end of the post.

Now, if you wish to participate and submit an image here is how you do it:-

  • You must email me the image you want to include and if you have a blog or website, or somewhere else, please include the link. My email address is leanne@leannecole.com.au
  • The image size should be as small as it can be, so the largest side should be 1000 pixels or less.
  • Please insert either your name or your blogs name in the file name.
  • Remember I am on Australian time, so with GMT I am +11 hours at the moment, I publish my post on Wednesday morning.
  • If you need more help with sending images, and get confused about time zones, etc, well, there is a great website called The World Clock, if you go to that and look at Melbourne time, if it’s before 6pm on Tuesday evening, then you can still send me images.  If it’s after that time, you can send me an image, but it will be set aside for the following week.
  • Remember to include a link to your blog or website.
  • Please remember to resize your images, it is fairly simply, you just need to go into any editing software and usually under Image you will find, resize, scale, or image size, something like that and you can resize your image there. Change the dimensions to pixels and make the longest side 1000 pixels or smaller, hit return, and for most types of software that should change the other side automatically as well. Just remember to save it with a different name so you know it is the smaller version.  If you have any problems, please contact me, I don’t mind helping out.

Please note you don’t have to be a WordPress blogger to be in this challenge, you can have a link to a Facebook page, a Flickr page, anywhere really, or no link.  We just want to encourage people to do monochrome images, just for the madness of it.

Just to let you know also, that as soon as the challenge is published, all emails and images you have sent me are deleted from my computer.  I respect your copyright and would never keep any of the images.

Monochrome Madness Week 17

Here I was thinking that this weeks Monochrome Madness was going to be a small group and then all of a sudden I was inundated with emails, all good.  So still a nice group of images and I am sure you will all enjoy them.  I have heard from some that you are enjoying the discussions taking place with the images, and I think that is fantastic, so please keep doing it. Though I haven’t responded to everyone’s emails, I’m so sorry, I am travelling today, and the last few days have been a bit busy getting everything organised.  As such, I won’t be on the internet much, I can approve comments, but would love it if you all just respond to the comments where you can, to all of them.  I would love to see you doing that, so everyone is responsible, got that?

lily-black-white-monochrome-closeup

A while back I got some extension tubes, the polaroid ones, which I know are good, but I didn’t get the ones that you can use the auto focus on, so I decided to just get some Kenko ones.  I knew I would use them, and they would be a good enough substitution until I can afford a macro lens, well at least let me see if I really want one and would use one.  So for my image this week I thought I would make use of the lilies that have started growing in my garden again.  I used the 50mm lens with the 20mm extension tube.  I had to use my tripod, which isn’t a bad thing.  I enjoyed getting some images like this.  I do love lilies in black and white.

woodsleaves-web

Laura Macky has sent her image for this week and she said she was trying something new.  You can check out what she was doing in her post here.  Something else I thought I would tell you about, Laura has entered a competition and she wants you all to vote for her, here is the link, voting for Laura’s image.

As per usual the gallery is here for you and all the links are below.  Remember if you want to send an image all the instructions are below.

Now, if you wish to participate and submit an image here is how you do it:-

  • You must email me the image you want to include and if you have a blog or website, or somewhere else, please include the link. My email address is leanne@leannecole.com.au
  • The image size should be as small as it can be, so the largest side should be 1000 pixels or less.
  • Please insert either your name or your blogs name in the file name.
  • Remember I am on Australian time, so with GMT I am +11 hours at the moment, I publish my post on Wednesday morning.
  • If you need more help with sending images, and get confused about time zones, etc, well, there is a great website called The World Clock, if you go to that and look at Melbourne time, if it’s before 6pm on Tuesday evening, then you can still send me images.  If it’s after that time, you can send me an image, but it will be set aside for the following week.
  • Remember to include a link to your blog or website.
  • Please remember to resize your images, it is fairly simply, you just need to go into any editing software and usually under Image you will find, resize, scale, or image size, something like that and you can resize your image there. Change the dimensions to pixels and make the longest side 1000 pixels or smaller, hit return, and for most types of software that should change the other side automatically as well. Just remember to save it with a different name so you know it is the smaller version.  If you have any problems, please contact me, I don’t mind helping out.

Please note you don’t have to be a WordPress blogger to be in this challenge, you can have a link to a Facebook page, a Flickr page, anywhere really, or no link.  We just want to encourage people to do monochrome images, just for the madness of it.

Just to let you know also, that as soon as the challenge is published, all emails and images you have sent me are deleted from my computer.  I respect your copyright and would never keep any of the images.

Up for Discussion – Infrared Photography

Last week for the Monochrome Madness Challenge I did an image and I added a infrared filter in post to it to give the impression of it being infrared. It was fairly obvious it wasn’t, but it was fun playing around with it. Infrared is something you do see from time to time, but not many of us have dedicated equipment for it.  I thought it might be good to get some information on how you can go about doing it, so I have asked fellow blogger, Infraredrobert to guest post and to tell you how he does his.

Infrared Photography by Robert

By revealing what is normally invisible to the human eye, infrared photography captures light in the near-infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum by recording infrared reflections on either specially sensitized film or digital camera sensors.

It’s all Just Radiation: The Science Behind the Art

Before we get to the art of infrared (IR) photography, I need to speak briefly about the science behind it. As photographers, we are doing nothing more than capturing visible light radiation that is reflected off our subjects. Visible light is just a small portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that our unaided eyes can detect. The human eye can see light waves with frequencies between 390 to 700 nanometers (1 nm = 1 billionth of a meter). Infrared light lies just beyond what the human eye can detect, with frequencies between 750nm and 1mm. In the digital infrared photography discussed here, we will be imaging in the near-IR portion of the spectrum at wavelengths between 700nm to 1400nm.

The important thing to note here is that digital infrared photography captures reflected light radiation – not emitted radiation. Therefore, you cannot “see” in total darkness using near-infrared imaging.

Camera and Equipment

Digital camera sensors (CCD or CMOS) do nothing more than convert light into a digital value. Camera manufacturers have known for some time that these sensors can detect light outside the visible spectrum, so they provide a dichroic filter (hot mirror) over the sensor to exclude unwanted (IR) light. As camera technology has evolved, these hot mirrors have become better at excluding unwanted light from the sensor.

If you would like to try shooting digital infrared, you have two options: Find an older camera with a less efficient hot mirror (such as the Nikon CoolPix 950) and use a filter over the lens to exclude visible light (such as a Wratten 87 or Hoya RM-72); or convert a camera into a dedicated IR camera by replacing the hot mirror with one that passes only IR wavelengths. It is important to note that once a conversion is done, you can no longer take conventional images with the camera.

For my imaging, I have opted for the latter and use a converted Nikon D100. My camera was converted by lifepixel, but there are numerous companies worldwide that perform this service. My only recommendations are to use a reputable company, and do not attempt the conversion on your own.

Another important consideration is the lens you will use as some are better than others for IR imaging. From my own experience, my standard 18-55mm Nikkor yields the best results, while images from my much more expensive 12-24mm Nikkor are disappointing due to a lot of internal flare from the optical elements. Check around for online feedback for your particular lens to see if others have had any issues with them when shooting infrared.

How I Work

All my shots are taken in aperture priority mode using a three-frame bracket of +1, 0, -1 stops. Capture is done in RAW mode and brought into Photoshop through Adobe Camera Raw (ACR).

After picking the best image from my bracketed set in Adobe Bridge, I increase the Clarity to 75% in ACR (Adobe Camera Raw) and then open in Photoshop (PS). The images will have low contrast and look very red as they are brought into the post-processing program.

Processing Steps

1. Channel Mixer: Working with adjustment layers in PS, I do a Channel Swap using the Channel Mixer. Set the Red channel to R=0 G=0 B= 100; set the Blue Channel at R=100 G=0 B=0.

1_RAW

2. Levels adjustment: Sometimes “auto” works, but be aware that this will affect color balance as well, so use with caution. Most images need both a boost the mid-tones and in the contrast.

2_Mixed

3. B&W or Color: At this point, you need to decide if you want to have the image retain color, or go as monochrome. When converting to monochrome, I always use the Convert to Black and White adjustment rather than simply converting to grayscale. By choosing the B&W adjustment option, you can further manipulate the contrast by using the color conversion sliders.

3_Levels

4. Tone: The Toning option is done through the Photo Filter adjustment. My particular favorites are Sepia (Warming) and 80A (Cooling). I rarely go much more than 15% with either.

4_BW

5. Brightness Contrast/Curves: Use either or both to get you to where you want to be in the image.

5_Final

6. Finalize: Flatten the layers and Smart Sharpen (Amt. 133, Radius 1.5).

Of course, any of these steps can be used with layer masks, blend modes and other elements to bring out what you want in the final image.

On a Personal Note

I am particularly fond of shooting man-made objects juxtaposed with natural elements. In post-processing, the clouds and sky are often a surprise as formations are usually invisible to my eye when framing the shot. Regardless of your subject matter, infrared photography allows you to truly see your world in a different light.

A special thank you to Leanne for allowing me to discuss this topic here as well as hosting all her very informative posts. If you have any additional questions, please feel free to email me at: Robert@digital-infrared.com

Links:

Robert’s sites:

www.digital-infrared.com (IR images only)

www.infraredrobert.wordpress.com (IR and Conventional imaging)

http://inadifferentlightbook.wordpress.com/ (Book sample site)

Lifepixel: www.lifepixel.com

IR lens comparison chart: http://dpanswers.com/content/irphoto_lenses.php

Thank you

Back to me, I would just like to thank Robert for writing this for us and I hope you learned a lot more about infrared photography.  The results are always stunning.  He has sent me some more image for you to look at as well, so I will included the ones above as well, and the extra wonderful images.

Introductions – C R Photography

How I discovered the work of todays Introduction is very different to the way I usually do.  Really he discovered me, so to speak, in that he sent me an email about something, and it got me curious.  I looked at his blog and really liked the work I saw.  So today I would like to introduce you to Chris and his blog C R Photography.

springmeath_2

There are some great images on his site and the perspectives of some of them, like the one above are great. I love seeing work that I think I can learn from.

I asked Chris why he takes photos.

I take on a very poetic-philosophic approach to my photography. Ultimately, I make photos because it’s therapeutic for me. It allows me to focus my mind into something creative.

grants-pass-or

As you go through his blog you will see there is a large variety of work and he photographs many things.  There is a concept in the art work, that you have to be one particular type of artist, in that you specialise in a particular area or genre, I think is the right term.  In photography we see it all the time, you are a landscape photographer or a portrait photographer, but I think many of us just want to take photos.  I like trying lots of different types, and I think perhaps Chris does too.  I can see many different sorts of photography and a great variety amongst his work.

The second question, as always, was about inspiration.

If I’m photographing people, it’s the mysteriousness and the dynamic of people that inspires me. When I’m making photos of nature, it’s nature itself that inspires me. I pull from within for a large amount of my inspiration but occasionally some of my favourite poets and photographers inspire me as well.

rural-fun_4

There is something about the colours in his work, I find I am very drawn to them. When you see the work all together you can see what I mean. It is quite colourful, but I don’t mean in a loud way, it is subtle, but yet the colours and hues are strong.  I’m sure I am not explaining myself very well, sorry, but I just like the colours.

I also asked Chris if there was anything special about the way he works.

Technically speaking, there’s not much that’s special about how I work. Shooting in manual mode is beneficial, but other than that it’s typically in being mindful and allowing all of my senses to be fully engaged. What this allows is for me to change from work or study mode, into a more peaceful and organic state. It, in a sense, allows me to become one with the subject to feel it in all it’s mysteriousness.

woolacombe-_3

There are also quite a large number of black and white images on his blog as well. As we have seen here on Wednesday’s there is something about Black and White images that really draw people in.  It is still so popular, something about the romantic side of photography perhaps.

I asked Chris about his gear.

As a new photographer (I’ve only been shooting for a little over a year), I’ve only acquired a small amount of gear. I have a Canon 7D, Canon 50mm 1.4, Canon 28-135mm and a Tokina 11-16mm. I have some other accessories, like a cabled remote, an intervelometer, and that’s about it.

lightning-storm_1

 

I have never photographed lightning like this.  I tried it once out my front door, but wasn’t too successful.  Must try it again some time, though usually when I hear a storm approaching, the only place I want to be is inside.  I do envy those that can get images like this.

Chris told me that he is currently living in the UK, though his is originally from the US.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank Chris for allowing me to feature his blog, C R Photography, here on my website, and I would encourage you all to go and take a look as well, you won’t be disappointed.  I have a small selection of his images for you to look at, but I suggest you go to his site, C R Photography, and see a whole lot more.

 

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