All posts tagged: composition

Outside the gates of El Sanctuario de Chimayo in Santa Fe

UfD: Workshop Lessons

Today for our Up for Discussion post Susan Portnoy from The Insatiable Traveler recently attended a photography workshop and she has written for us what she learned at the workshop. There are some great lessons here and I think we could learn a lot from this.   Five Essential Lessons (and One Great Tip) I learned about Photography at the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops BY SUSAN PORTNOY ON JULY 22, 2015 As a photographer always looking to hone my skills, I recently went on a unique adventure as the guest of the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops in New Mexico. I’d heard about the globally renowned workshops for years (the workshops are year round and boast an amazing roster of instructors) from photographers who were students and others who had the honor of being asked to teach. The Santa Maria building where I stayed and where breakfast and lunch was served The trip was a great learning experience and completely out of my comfort zone but exactly the kind of push I needed to up my game. …

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Introductions: Six Pixx

One of the things I love about Monochrome Madness is that I get to meet lots of new people, but I’m also introduced to lots of new blogs.  Today I am introducing you to someone who participates on a regular basis in Monochrome Madness and it has been wonderful getting to know her through it.  Maxine has the blog Six Pixx, and I am sure many of you are already very familiar with her work.  I’ve been watching what she has been doing for a while and decided it was time I asked her if I could feature her and her blog on my blog. I’ve noticed that over time her work has been catching my eye more and more and now I’m finding I am starting to recognise her work before I see the name.  There is something that she is doing that is making her work her own. I asked her what in the world she was. I’m in Hastings, on the south coast of England. It’s in 1066 country where William the …

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Up for Discussion: Susan Portnoy with Tips for Shooting Wildlife

Last year I introduced you to Susan Portnoy and her blog, The Insatiable Traveler, she has lots of photos of Wildlife from her trips to Africa and other places.  While she isn’t just a wildlife photographer, as you would notice if you follow her blog, she does love photographing the wild animals in Africa, so I asked her if she would be interested in doing a blog post for us on how she goes about this type of photography.   So, over to you Susan. EIGHT TIPS FOR SHOOTING WILDLIFE Wildlife photography is an addictive challenge filled with excitement, frustration, and its fair share of luck. There are so many variables that come in to play: What kind of wildlife are you shooting? Will you be in a vehicle or on foot? Are you in your own backyard or someplace unfamiliar thousands of miles away? It would be impossible to cover every angle. When Leanne asked me to pen this piece my head almost exploded from all the possibilities. So for the sake of this post I thought it would …

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Up for Discussion – Common Newbie Mistakes

Leading on from the post last week about critiquing I thought this week we could have a look at common mistakes that people make when they first start taking photos.  Of course not everyone does these things, but some people do. I just thought of something new to do with a post like this, I think it will work, let’s give it a try.  I know a few things that many people do when they start, but it has been over 20 years since I started, so what if I start the post and you guys finish it.  What I mean is, I will list a few things, and you will see what I do, and if you can think of additions to the list, then tell me in a comment, after I publish the post, I will leave the post in edit format on my computer and as you think of things to add I will add them and continually update the post.  I am home today so I should be able to do …

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Up for Discussion – Composition

Today’s guest blog is from Stacey who has a blog called Lensaddiction.  Stacey has offered to write a post on composition and some of the basic aspects of it that help make a good image.   Composition Basics I get frustrated by the fancy books and websites with amazing shots from Iceland and Patagonia, waterfalls in Norway, amazing scenery in places I can never expect to go. Usually shot by professionals with several days or even weeks to spend on site so that they get lots of opportunities to get the perfect sunrise or shot. This post is bought to you by just another photographer, with limited time and budget for gear and equipment, who is still learning every time she gets her camera out. Someone who goes to exotic locations hardly ever and if she does, has pretty much one opportunity to get the shot and has to deal with whatever the conditions are on the day. When you boil photography down to the very key elements, composition is ultimately what makes or breaks an …

Science World, Vancouver

Up for Discussion – The Golden Ratio

Today’s post is from Sarah Vercoe, I saw a post she had written on the Golden Ratio and I asked her if she would be interested in doing a post here to explain it to you.  I first heard about this at art school, though it was a little different, but the idea of the Golden Mean, and how some faces are considered more beautiful than others, and how the Golden Mean can be used to demonstrate it.  What Sarah is talking about is a little different and a lot more relevant to photography. Composition with impact: Using the Golden Ratio in Photography By Sarah Vercoe Composition is one of the most important aspects of photography, one that can make or break a photograph. A strong composition can give an ordinary subject appeal, just as poor composition can leave an otherwise appealing subject with no impact at all. The variety of composition guidelines available to photographers is seemingly endless, with some argued as being better than others. The Golden Ratio is one of those composition guidelines …

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Up for Discussion – Post Production on Images

Last week I received an email from Better Photography Magazine and it had an article in with the title Should A Landscape Photography Competition Be Art?.  I was intrigued.  It was also about a new competition and one that I recently entered.  It is a good read and it got me thinking about this whole problem we seem to have with the digital age and manipulating photos.   Let’s start in the days of film.  When you went out and did a shoot with a roll of film, you would come home and develop the negative.  There was no difference here, the film determined how the film or negative was processed.  Once the negative was ready to be printed, you would get your enlarger and do a proof sheet.  Lay all the negatives on a piece of paper, put a clear piece of glass over the top and expose the negs.  Then you would look through the negatives and decide which image you would want to print.  Before you print it, you would put it in the enlarger …