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It seemed appropriate to rename the posts, so from now on I am going to refer these as introductions.  I hope many of you already know the persons work, or you may be being introduced for the first time.

Cornwall Photographic 

Today we are looking at the work of Chillbrook and his beautiful images of the Cornwall countryside, hence the name of his blog.  The landscape of where he takes photos is very different to the landscapes I see here in Australia.

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This is the type of image that I very much associate with Chillbrook.  The vast moody landscape of the countryside.  I love the colours and how green it is.  The dark sky, to me is something that I always think of when I think of England.  There is something about the idea that it rains all the time in England.

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Every time I see this building in an image, I know that it is one of Chillbrook’s images.  This building is quite unique and I know, well I am pretty sure, he has photographed this many times and presented it in many different ways.

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What do you say to an image like this, but WOW.  I love this, I love everything about it.  Great shot.  The only thing I don’t like is that it isn’t an image I took.

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I am glad that he also takes photos of the boats and the wharfs of Cornwall as well.  For people, like me, who have never been there, it seems an important part of that area. He has taken quite a few photos of the fishing boats, I think that is what they are.

I asked Chillbrook for some information about his photograph, what inspires him, how long he has been taking photos, you know the sort of thing and he wrote the following.

“I used to take photographs as a young teenager.  My dad bought me a Russian Zenit camera for my 13th birthday.  This was the late ’70s and a time when if you bought a camera, even the cheaper ones like the Zenit, came in a lovely leather case to protect the camera and lens.  I loved it.  It was a manual camera, of course, and I quickly got to grips with the holy trinity of exposure and using my Dad’s light meter I experimented a fair bit and even developed a few black and white films in the dark room at school but regular teenagerly pursuits took over and I pretty much left photography there.

When I became ill with MS and had to retire from my teaching job, I moved to Cornwall, a place I’d had many happy childhood holidays, and decided I’d like to take up photography again. I bought myself the sort of camera I’d wanted for many years, a Nikon D800 and a superb Nikkor 24-70mm f2.8 lens.  I’d remembered the basics but over the last 18 months I’ve read a great deal, looked at tons of photographs and got to know my camera well and gradually, I’m getting to know Cornwall a little better too.

I take pictures for me but started a blog as a kind of online diary of my photographic journey and through the blog, I was introduced to a large community of very supportive and encouraging people and through them, I have found the confidence to move my photography onto a professional footing.  Through my website www.cornwallphotographic.net and a couple of local galleries, I have found a market for my prints and cards and I recently received a commission to produce a book of photographs depicting Cornwall’s history and heritage through its landscape and coastline.

I really believe that for a photograph to be successful, the photographer has to connect with the subject in a very real and fundamental way. This connection is very much a part of the creative process. You talk to wildlife photographers and they are passionate about wildlife.  Fashion photograhers are passionate about fashion.  I’m deeply in love with the Cornish landscape, from the beautiful and sometimes bleak moorland to the rugged coastline and beautiful beaches, the wild weather and the dramatic skies and this passion, I hope, is reflected in the photographs I take.”

I am going to put a number of images into a gallery now for you to look at, but there a lot more images on his blog Cornwall Photographic so I encourage you to go and take a look, and say hello.

I would like to thank Chillbrook from Cornwall Photographic for giving me permission to show you his work.

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